Cyber Tips for Traveling

Staying safe while traveling involves more than simply locking your valuables in a hotel safe. Today, cyber crime is just as prevalent as conventional crime. In fact, your digital property may be more valuable to criminals than your personal property. Before packing for your next business trip, take the following precautions to protect yourself and your belongings while away:

  • Turn off home and work computers before you leave. Computers that are always left on are more vulnerable to hacks.
  • Back up all data. Store sensitive files either on a removable storage device locked in a safe or in a secure facility in the
    cloud.
  • Be cautious when using public Wi-Fi. If it is necessary to go online in public, use a secured connection. If you have to use an unsecured connection, avoid checking bank balances or visiting any site that asks you for personal information, which can be easily stolen.
  • Enable a pass code on your smartphone. This can prevent hackers from accessing sensitive information should you lose your phone.
  • Use a credit card instead of a debit card for purchases. A cyber criminal can deplete your bank account with your debit card.

Prevent Heat Sickness When Working Outdoors
Hot weather, especially when combined with strenuous physical labor, can cause body temperatures to rise to unsafe levels leading to heat illnesses. Outdoor workers are especially vulnerable to heat-related illnesses because they spend the majority of the day outside in direct sunlight.

There are a variety of heat illnesses, including heat stroke, heat exhaustion, dehydration and heat cramps. Each of these illnesses vary in symptoms and severity, but commonly cause dizziness, weakness, nausea, blurry vision, confusion or loss of consciousness. To stay safe from the heat when working outdoors, consider doing the following:

  • Wear loose, light-colored clothing whenever possible.
  • Shield your head and face from direct sunlight with a hat.
  • Take short breaks to rest in the shade. If you are wearing heavy protective gear, consider removing it during your break to cool off even more.
  • Ease into your work, gradually building up to more strenuous activity as the day progresses. In addition, you should avoid overexerting yourself during peak temperature periods (midday).
  • Drink liquids frequently, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Experts recommend drinking at least 8 ounces every 20 to 30 minutes to stay hydrated. Stick to water, fruit juice and sport drinks. Try to avoid caffeinated beverages, as they can dehydrate you.

Employees should monitor themselves and co-workers on hot days. If you notice any signs of heat illness, notify your on-duty
supervisor immediately. Most often, heat illness sufferers can be treated by being moved to a cooler area and given liquids. In extreme cases of heat stroke where an employee is unconscious, you will have to call an ambulance immediately.


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